Sawhorse Standing Desk

I’m constantly searching “workspaces” on Pinterest and pinning to my space board. Two things I found in common with almost every space I love: plants and standing desks. The idea of standing up while writing, doing projects, and working on homework really appealed to me. Plus, I love how standing desks look and the amount of work space most of them provide.

Determined to make my own standing desk, I set off to a couple of my go-to project places: Lowe’s and Habitat for Humanity Restore.

Here’s what I bought:

  • Old wood door- Habitat for Humanity, $1 (dollar door section) Side note: At first, I was concerned about the hole in the door where the doorknob used to be, but my sister pointed out that it’ll be perfect for my laptop cord to go through!  
  • Five 2×4 pieces- Lowe’s, $8
  • Sawhorse Brackets– Lowe’s, $7
  • Wood Finish in English Chestnut- Lowe’s, $4
  • Liquid Nails, $3

The height of the wood depends on your height (first 4 pieces) and the length of your door or desk top (fifth piece). Everyone is always friendly and patient at Lowe’s and will cut the wood for you for free.

I told the man that helped me that I wanted the “legs” of my desk to be standing height. We held the wood up and I put my hands where I would rest them on a desk or laptop. The fifth piece of wood should be length of your desktop (or door) minus about 4 inches. I was able to buy a scrap piece of wood for the fifth piece for only 75 cents!

Once I had all of my supplies, the desk went together in 4 simple steps:

1. Paint the top and sides of the door and stain all 5 wood pieces

2. With liquid nails, glue the fifth piece of wood (the one different than the other four) to the bottom of the door *let dry for 1-2 days*

wood

3. Slide the other four pieces of wood into the two sawhorse clamps (they’ll fit perfectly, but might take an extra oomph)

4. Attach the sawhorses to the piece of wood on the bottom of the door

My last step was to to find a stool on Craigslist for $5 and paint it white to match the door. This project started off completely as an experiment, but I am so happy with how it turned out!

photo

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Chevron Painted Table

I’m loving the new chevron stripe trend, and I was excited to give it a try today! I began with an old sewing machine cabinet from my Grandma’s attic, painted it white, and then started the fairly easy chevron process. I first printed out a pattern; I used this one, but you can use whatever size you want or draw your one. Next, I used painting tape and taped the pattern right on to my table like this:

I wasn’t too worried about making the lines perfect, but perfect is definitely doable! I painted the areas outside of the tape, waited for it to dry, slowly removed the tape, and wa-la chevron!!

I finished off by priming and then painting the drawer pull turquoise. Because the table was given to me for free and I used left over paint, the project ended up being very inexpensive (less than 5 dollars!) Here is the before and after: