Sawhorse Standing Desk

I’m constantly searching “workspaces” on Pinterest and pinning to my space board. Two things I found in common with almost every space I love: plants and standing desks. The idea of standing up while writing, doing projects, and working on homework really appealed to me. Plus, I love how standing desks look and the amount of work space most of them provide.

Determined to make my own standing desk, I set off to a couple of my go-to project places: Lowe’s and Habitat for Humanity Restore.

Here’s what I bought:

  • Old wood door- Habitat for Humanity, $1 (dollar door section) Side note: At first, I was concerned about the hole in the door where the doorknob used to be, but my sister pointed out that it’ll be perfect for my laptop cord to go through!  
  • Five 2×4 pieces- Lowe’s, $8
  • Sawhorse Brackets– Lowe’s, $7
  • Wood Finish in English Chestnut- Lowe’s, $4
  • Liquid Nails, $3

The height of the wood depends on your height (first 4 pieces) and the length of your door or desk top (fifth piece). Everyone is always friendly and patient at Lowe’s and will cut the wood for you for free.

I told the man that helped me that I wanted the “legs” of my desk to be standing height. We held the wood up and I put my hands where I would rest them on a desk or laptop. The fifth piece of wood should be length of your desktop (or door) minus about 4 inches. I was able to buy a scrap piece of wood for the fifth piece for only 75 cents!

Once I had all of my supplies, the desk went together in 4 simple steps:

1. Paint the top and sides of the door and stain all 5 wood pieces

2. With liquid nails, glue the fifth piece of wood (the one different than the other four) to the bottom of the door *let dry for 1-2 days*

wood

3. Slide the other four pieces of wood into the two sawhorse clamps (they’ll fit perfectly, but might take an extra oomph)

4. Attach the sawhorses to the piece of wood on the bottom of the door

My last step was to to find a stool on Craigslist for $5 and paint it white to match the door. This project started off completely as an experiment, but I am so happy with how it turned out!

photo

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Map Wall Art

With only one month until Kat and I move into our house, I’m starting to cross projects off of my to-do list. I recently saw this picture on pinterest, but I was disappointed that there was no tutorial. After unsuccessfully looking around for one, I figured I should just make my own:

Supplies:

  • 3-4 pieces of barn wood (I found 4 pieces at my cottage)
  • Modge podge (Make your own! 1/2 elmer’s glue, 1/2 water, shake)
  • Medium sized paint brush
  • Map poster (I bought mine here for $5 with shipping!)

    

The first step is to cut the map into strips the size of the boards. One reason I bought such a cheap map is because it killed me a little having to cut it up.

Next, pick one of your boards and apply a coat of modge podge right onto the wood. Lay your piece of map on the board and add another layer on top. After you’ve added a layer on top, use your hands to push out any air bubbles. You can also use the paint brush, but I found it wasn’t as effective as hands. The last optional step is to rip the edges. The edges look more natural if they are ripped when the paper is wet from the modge podge. There’s no specific way to do this, it depends how distressed you want it to come out.

Repeat the steps with each board, let dry, and that’s it! The final product has a nice matte finish and the map appears to be printed on to the wood boards. I plan to hang this in our living room using command strips.

Coat/Purse Hanger!

I was inspired by this tutorial of how to make your own coat hanger. I love the idea of using mix matched knobs, plus they are a lot easier to find if you’re not set on having them matching. I found three knobs and a pull at the Grand Rapids Habitat for Humanity Restore. This is a great store if you’re looking for something really specific (like a door or knobs!) All together, the knobs and pull cost under $2; compared to a hardware store where they cost anywhere from $2-$10 a piece! The piece of wood was found under the desk at my cottage- the more beat up the better!

Supplies:

  • knobs/pulls
  • piece of barn or drift wood
  • screw driver
  • sand paper, paint (optional)

After you have your supplies, the coat hanger is really simple to make. Just drill holes where you want the knobs, screw them in, and you’re done! The tutorial I found didn’t use a pull, but I found that mine is perfect to hang an umbrella. I beat up the wood a little more with some sand paper and a hammer and you could paint it too. For $2 I have a cute little coat hanger for the doorway of my new house!